Best Tennis Rackets of 2019: You Miss Every Shot You Don’t Take

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HEAD Ti.S6 Strung Tennis Racquet (4-1/4), Strung
Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3 Strung Tennis Racket (Black/White, 4 3/8)
Babolat 2018 Pure Aero Tennis Racquet - Quality String (4-3/8)
Yonex VCSI98YX Tennis Racket, Flash Orange
Wilson Tour Slam Tennis Racquet (EA)
Our Score
9.1
8.8
8.6
8.2
7.9
MSRP
$79.95
$87.76
$169.00
from $199.00
$27.39
Size
4 ¼”
4 ¼”
4 ⅜”
4 ½”
4 ⅜”
Weight
8 oz
9 oz
11 oz
12 oz
10.2 oz
Materials
Aluminum
Graphite
Graphite
Elastic, graphite
Graphite
Head Size
115 square inches
110 square inches
100 square inches
98 square inches
112 square inches
String Material
Nylon
Nylon
Nylon
Nylon
Nylon
HEAD Ti.S6 Strung Tennis Racquet (4-1/4), Strung
Our Score
9.1
MSRP
$79.95
Size
4 ¼”
Weight
8 oz
Materials
Aluminum
Head Size
115 square inches
String Material
Nylon
More Information
Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3 Strung Tennis Racket (Black/White, 4 3/8)
Our Score
8.8
MSRP
$87.76
Size
4 ¼”
Weight
9 oz
Materials
Graphite
Head Size
110 square inches
String Material
Nylon
More Information
Babolat 2018 Pure Aero Tennis Racquet - Quality String (4-3/8)
Our Score
8.6
MSRP
$169.00
Size
4 ⅜”
Weight
11 oz
Materials
Graphite
Head Size
100 square inches
String Material
Nylon
More Information
Yonex VCSI98YX Tennis Racket, Flash Orange
Our Score
8.2
MSRP
from $199.00
Size
4 ½”
Weight
12 oz
Materials
Elastic, graphite
Head Size
98 square inches
String Material
Nylon
More Information
Wilson Tour Slam Tennis Racquet (EA)
Our Score
7.9
MSRP
$27.39
Size
4 ⅜”
Weight
10.2 oz
Materials
Graphite
Head Size
112 square inches
String Material
Nylon
More Information

Tennis requires precise equipment. 

It’s no hundred meter dash—you can’t just hit the ground running and hope for the best. 

Your equipment matters, and amongst all of them, like a painter needs a paintbrush, a tennis athlete needs their racket. 

If you want to properly use all the variables that you bring to the table in an effective way, you need a racket that suits you, not just whatever happens to be cheapest at the department store.

One of the tricky things about tennis is finding the perfect racket that corresponds to your height, weight, and overall movement. 

It doesn’t sound like it would be hard to figure all that out, but it matters. You have something that’s called your center of gravity, and it dictates your balance. 

We need to find you a racket that’s going to fit you perfectly, which is what this guide is all about. 

Regardless of how you want to spell it, these are the best tennis racquets on the market.

Our Reviews Of The Best Tennis Rackets Of 2019

#1 HEAD Ti.S6 Tennis Racquet​

HEAD Ti.S6 Tennis Racquet

Top tennis racquets all have one thing in common: they’re lightweight. 

Really good brands focus on making lightweight rackets that don’t skimp out on power. 

The aluminum frame of this racket delivers a nice hollow hit when you crack against a tennis ball, so even if you don’t hit against the strings, you’ll still be able to knock it forward at fast speeds.

Thanks to the frame, it’s a total of 8 oz for the entire racket—you read that right, eight total ounces. 

Part of that is due to the nylon strings being extremely lightweight and sturdy. 

This is sold by a company called Just Tennis, and they personally guarantee that the strings will not break for an absolute minimum of thirty days. 

From that point, if your frame were to run into any problems, you also have a one-year warranty on that to protect you from loss due to damage or manufacturer defect.

For a skill level, the Ti.S6 is basically your intermediate level racket. It’s good for beginners, but not perfect for them, and when you upgrade from there you’ll feel right at  home. 

This is a racket you could bring with you all the way to the pro circuit if that’s something you want to pursue; it’s meant to grow with you. 

String tightness is fairly decent, though if you decide to restring it, you will run into a difficult time with small slots for the strings being tedious to run them through.

The only major downside is that while this does have a dampener, which is supposed to reduce ping, it’s still noticeable. 

You’re not currently on national television, so the ping isn’t a problem, it’s just something you’re going to notice. 

If you’re someone who focuses on small sounds, this might become slightly irritating to use after a while, but for most tennis players it will work just fine.

Technical specifications

  • Size: 4 ¼”
  • Weight: 8 oz
  • Materials: Aluminum
  • Head Size: 115 square inches
  • String Material: Nylon

#2 Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3

Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3

Wilson didn’t just make a good tennis racquet; they made one of the best we’ve ever used, and it almost stole the top spot on our list. 

Made of graphite and built with a counterbalance weight system, this is basically your go-to racket for indoor and outdoor use. 

Clay fields, grass, it doesn’t matter; you’re going to see a spike in your performance levels.

Most Wilson rackets sit around the exact same price range even though their models vary, but the Hyper Hammer 5.3 has a bit of fluctuation depending on what handle grip size you pick (and the monetary difference is quite staggering). 

They made a good racket that’s not ridiculously expensive, they just chose their pricing a bit weird.

The open string weaving design gives maximum power when you crack back against that inbound tennis ball. 

Equipped with a comfortable grip on the handle, this feels right at home in the palm of your hands. 

Nine ounces is the perfect weight to grant you excessive speed while still having enough mass to return powerful shots over the net to your opponent. 

It’s a solid piece that will work from your beginner years up through the pro circuit.

Technical specifications

  • Size: 4 ¼”
  • Weight: 9 oz
  • Materials: Graphite
  • Head Size: 110 square inches
  • String Material: Nylon

#3 Babolat 2018 Pure Aero Tennis Racquet

Babolat 2018 Pure Aero Tennis Racquet

If you need the best tennis racquet for beginners, then this racket, the one that Raphael Nadal endorses, is exactly what you need. 

It’s no Wilson when it comes to pricing, but it’s worth the investment no matter which way you look at it. 

They spared no attention to detail on this one. 

Your strings have a 55 lb weight limit, which is fulfilled and guaranteed through the USRSA master racquet technicians being accountable for stringing this.

Nylon strings are usually the go-to to keep things cheap, and Babolat is no exception. 

Nylon is durable and inexpensive, but with the right grade and construction, it can also last for ages. 

Expect this racket to get you through thick and thin out on the court. 

The comfortable counterbalance of control in this eleven ounce racket gives you excellent spin when your crack that ball back over the net.

You aren’t penalized for wanting a different grip length, either. Choose from 4 ⅛” up to 4 ⅜” without a single penny in price difference. 

Given the already high cost, this would have been a sore cash grab tactic had they changed the size pricing.

Intermediate players will get a kick out of this as well’ it’s an all-level racket that you can take to the club, or casually use at home on your own DIY tennis court. 

When not in use, you’re supposed to keep your tennis racket in a cover, and thankfully Babolat includes a high quality one for you with your purchase. 

Your skills are already great, but with Babolat, they can be taken even further.

Technical specifications

  • Size: 4 ⅜”
  • Weight: 11 oz
  • Materials: Graphite
  • Head Size: 100 square inches
  • String Material: Nylon

#4 Yonex VCORE Si 98 Lite

Yonex VCORE Si 98 Lite

They say that when you start out, you need a bigger racquet head to get started. 

That may be true, but what’s also true is that you need to have immense control. 

Yonex isn’t designed for the newcomer with their first time on the court, but after light practice, you’ll be able to tame this wild beast and make some amazing shots. 

Build out of graphite and elastic, the handle and frame gives more bend when you return the ball, so you aren’t feeling massive fibration in your arm.

That’s called a dampener, and they’re usually not included in a lot of medium-price models, but Yonex knew exactly what they were doing when they made the best tennis racquet for intermediate players. 

With a black micro core, it cuts down on air resistance by about 14% according to controlled laboratory studies.

One of the reasons why this is best suited for intermediate players is the 3D vector shaft. 

It gives more stiffness to the inside of this twelve ounce racket, so you can be a bit more precise. 

Normally, we don’t like any racket head size that’s under 100 square inches, and this rests as 98. 

It could have used a slight adjustment, but it gets the job done and works a treat for those who want better control and handling.

Unlike others who use a simple stringing system, Yonex has a hybrid system in place to grant great resistance against the ball when you hit it, which ends up in a fantastic spin. 

Every aspect of this is basically designed to improve your game by small percentage points in different areas.

Technical specifications

  • Size: 4 ½”
  • Weight: 12 oz
  • Materials: Elastic, graphite
  • Head Size: 98 square inches
  • String Material: Nylon

#5 Wilson Tour Slam Lite​

Last but not least, we have Wilson’s beginner model that helps you get the grip of the gamek, so to speak. 

Speaking of grip, they put a good one on this that gives you fair control, while the counterbalance weight in the racket head and handle help out with that. 

It’s a little bit heavier than most beginner models, but after looking at tennis racquet reviews, we found that it was preferred by most users.

Graphite is durable and easy to create, which is what makes this racket a budgeter’s dream come true. 

You’ll have nothing but smooth sailing from purchase to opening it up out of the package. 

Not that it’s really unexpected, but do note that this doesn’t come with a cover or any add-ons like extra strings; what you see is what you get, and for the low cost, there’s nothing wrong with that.

Bridge stringing systems matter a lot, because it dictates the way that the strings react when the head makes contact with the ball. 

It’s responsible for dampening the vibrations (and the ping sound) when you make contact with the ball, so you’ll be looking to the string system for higher tier models as well. 

Good thing is, Wilson’s power string system is already designed to be on-brand with delivering powerful hits, and smoother serves. 

Despite it being marketed as a beginner’s racket, it holds a lot of the same requirements that pro circuit players look for when buying a new tennis racket.

Technical specifications

  • Size: 4 ⅜”
  • Weight: 10.2 oz
  • Materials: Graphite
  • Head Size: 112 square inches
  • String Material: Nylon

Tennis Racket FAQ

Bunch Of Tennis Rackets

Which Size Tennis Racket Should I Get?

You have to take three different aspects of your racket and look at them objectively. 

That’s how you decide what size to get. Your racket size is relative to your height and muscle strength

Traditionally, most adult-sized rackets are 27” long, with junior rackets going as short as 19”.

You’ll see that most top rated tennis rackets are 27”, and when they end up longer (29” or 31”), they’re a lot heavier. 

As the total racket length gets longer, the grip size will also grow. You can find some smaller head sizes for rackets with long handles to account for larger hands.

Which Tennis Racket is Best for Beginners?

The best tennis racket for the money and the best for beginners are two different things. 

You can always find a cheaper racket, but that’s where the problems come in. The best beginner racket is the 4 ¼” Head Ti.S6 on the top of our list. 

That’s not just because it landed the top spot, it’s just designed better from the handle grip length to the lightweight build, and everything in between. 

It’s the ultimate beginner racket that can still upgrade with your skill level, even into the pro circuit.

We cover grip sizes later in this post. You might end up sizing your grip size up later on, but for now this is the best racket for ultimate control. 

You have to start by learning how to hit your shots and smacks your serves, otherwise your long game isn’t going to be very good at all.

Is Heavier Tennis Racket Better?

Racket In Hand

You want to know how to choose a tennis racquet for beginners? 

You look at the total weight of the racket. You’re swing these pretty hard, which requires a lot of power to lean into those hits. 

That puts strain on your wrist and your hands, and it can be pretty rough at first. Well, that’s how it is for some people.

Others use a standard or lightweight racket and it’s like nothing to then, it feels like a plastic spatula. 

That signifies that you need a heavier racket. 

The benefits of heavier rackets include more power when you swing, and they often require less tension on the strings to get a heavy hit (since there’s more string surface in total).

With smaller rackets, you’re given more control over how fast you make the racket meet the ball, but that comes at a cost; everything has a balance. 

The power you distribute isn’t as high as a heavier racket. 

When heavy objects move and pick up speed, their mass and velocity become greater, and kinetic energy becomes more powerful. 

A larger racket will crack a tennis ball far but with less control, and vice versa for a smaller one.

What Tension Should I String my Tennis Racquet?

Racket Strings

There’s a way to measure if you even should be stringing your racket in the first place. 

If you get one of the best tennis racket deals and end up with an expensive model, but you didn’t pay that much for it, you should restring it. 

If you began with a bargain bin racket that cost under $20, you should buy a new tennis racket.

That being said, your individual racket brand, provided that it is a quality brand, will have information on what racket strength you need in order to maintain the same feeling as when you bought it. 

It depends on the head size, but usually around 55-65 lbs of pressure on the strings is where you want it to be at. 

Lower string tension has more give when the ball hits the strings, and a higher tension makes it bounce off it like a rubber ball against granite.

What Grip Size do Pro Tennis Players Use?

Top rated tennis racquets come in a variety of handle sizes, but there’s a sweet spot that most of the pros are using, and there’s a reason why. 

One of the basic beginner racket models that you’ll come across generally uses a 4 ⅛” racket grip size. 

There’s nothing wrong with this; in the beginning, it offers unparalleled control that larger handles cannot offer an untrained tennis player.

But sooner or later, everybody upgrades unless they’re extremely short. 

On average, women’s tennis players stick to a 4 ⅜” size since more women in tennis are shorter than men are, and more men stick to a 4 ⅝”. 

It’s only a quarter inch difference, but it can be a big change when you get into the game. 

The larger end of the spectrum for those with big hands is about 5 ⅛”, which allows for better double backhand control if you can manage it.

It’s not uncommon to start off smaller and work your way up. 

You can find various forum posts online where players with 20+ years experience end up switching a quarter inch up, and it makes the world of difference to them. 

Eventually, when you develop those wrist muscles and the muscle memory for how to play tennis, you kind of outgrow the smaller size. An upgrade is definitely needed after a while.

What Head Size Should I Get?

Wilson Racket Head

This space is dictated by the exact measurement of where the strings reside, though it is also important to have a good understanding of the frame and how its size, weight and material will impact your swing. 

Everything about this will be measured in square inches, and will differ if buying from a European source; measurement exchanges tend to get a bit blurry.

Head size matters on a racket because the larger it is, the more string rebound area there will be, which can allow for greater and faster strikes back to your opponent’s side of the net. 

The reason for this is that it has more of a way to absorb the shock of the inbound strike, and more time to propel it out of the racket and use more of your kinetic energy that you supply from your arm.

Smaller racket heads will alternatively provide less power and slower shots (still very fast shots, just with less capability than big racket heads), so it focuses on control over power. 

For shorter tennis players, small racket heads help to be more precise, but it’s also less square inches for the ball to make contact with. 

If you’re playing with a racket and the ball keeps on hitting the top rim of the frame, you could need a slight size upgrade.

Look at your height and your skill level. If you can manage it, a larger head racket’s power is a big advantage on the court. 

You need the proper muscles, wrist control and stability to use one though, since you’ll be swinging more weight around. 

Much like with other sports, your instrument comes down to your own body specifications.

The Court is Yours if You Fight for It

You’re about to clutch onto the best tennis racquet on the market for your specific needs; aren’t you excited? 

It’s time to step up your game, and if you’re a newcomer, this will set you off on the right path. 

There’s nothing but excellent fun and intense athletic exercise ahead of you, so let’s make it count. 

For more information on the best accompanying tennis gear and about how to elevate your game, check out our other guides and ever-growing library of free content.

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